Daily Wisdom / Pema Chödrön

Bodhisattvas and Warriors

Book coverBodhichitta exists on two levels. First there is unconditional
bodhichitta, an immediate experience that is refreshingly free of concept, opinion, and our usual all-caught-upness. It’s something hugely good that we are not able to pin down even slightly, like knowing at gut level that there’s absolutely nothing to lose. Second there is relative bodhichitta, our ability to keep our hearts and minds open to suffering without shutting down.

Those who train wholeheartedly in awakening unconditional and relative bodhichitta are called bodhisattvas or warriors—not warriors who kill and harm but warriors of nonaggression who hear the cries of the world. These are men and women who are willing to train in the middle of the fire. Training in the middle of the fire can mean that warrior-bodhisattvas enter challenging situations in order to alleviate suffering. It also refers to their willingness to cut through personal reactivity and self-deception, to their dedication to uncovering the basic undistorted energy of bodhichitta. We have many examples of master warriors—people like Mother Teresa and Martin Luther King—who recognized that the greatest harm comes from our own aggressive minds. They devoted their lives to helping others understand this truth. There are also many ordinary people who spend their lives training in opening their hearts and minds in order to help others do the same. Like them, we could learn to relate to ourselves and our world as warriors. We could train in awakening our courage and love.

From The Places That Scare You: A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times by Pema Chödrön, pages 5–6

One thought on “Bodhisattvas and Warriors

  1. Did King ever say that the “Greatest harm comes from our own aggressive minds? Its hard to imaging King sitting around his house all day contemplating raindrops and flowers. ” He was out in the streets getting arrested, taking risks and struggling on behalf of the poor, ostracized for associating with revolutionaries and communists, threatened repeatedly by the FBI and finally murdered for his beliefs. How many contemporary American Buddhists are trying to emulate anything like that?

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